Archives for : February2015

SearchCap: Bing Ads Editor, Client Management & Google Knowledge Graph

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web. The post SearchCap: Bing Ads Editor, Client Management & Google Knowledge Graph appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

SEOSearchGuru Now Enabling Their Clients with Local Online Marketing in LA at Reasonable Prices

With their team of skilled professionals, the SEO Company in Los Angeles aims to deliver effective Local Online Marketing services. Local SEO or …

My Favorite 5 Analytics Dashboards – Whiteboard Friday

Posted by KitsapKing

Finding effective ways of organizing your analytics dashboards is quite a bit easier if you can get a sense for what has worked for others. To that end, in today’s Whiteboard Friday the founder of Sixth Man Marketing, Ed Reese, shares his five favorite approaches.

For reference, here’s a still of this week’s whiteboard!

Video transcription

Hi, I’m Ed Reese with Sixth Man Marketing and Local U. Welcome to this edition of Whiteboard Friday. Today we’re going to talk about one of my favorite things in terms of Google Analytics — the dashboard.

So think of your dashboard like the dashboard on your car — what’s important to you and what’s important to your client. I have the new Tesla dashboard, you might recognize it. So, for my Tesla dashboard, I want navigation, tunes, calendar, everything and a bag of chips. You notice my hands are not on the wheel because it drives itself now. Awesome.

So, what’s important? I have the top five dashboards that I like to share with my clients and create for them. These are the executive dashboards — one for the CMO on the marketing side, new markets, content, and a tech check. You can actually create dashboards and make sure that everything is working.

These on the side are some of the few that I think people don’t take a look at as often. It’s my opinion that we have a lot of very generic dashboards, so I like to really dive in and see what we can learn so that your client can really start using them for their advantage.

#1 – Executives

Let’s start with the executive dashboard. There is a lot of debate on whether or not to go from left to right or right to left. So in terms of outcome, behavior, and acquisition, Google Analytics gives you those areas. They don’t mark them as these three categories, but I follow Avinash’s language and the language that GA uses.

When you’re talking to executives or CFOs, it’s my personal opinion that executives always want to see the money first. So focus on financials, conversion rates, number of sales, number of leads. They don’t want to go through the marketing first and then get to the numbers. Just give them what they want. On a dashboard, they’re seeing that first.

So let’s start with the result and then go back to behavior. Now, this is where a lot of people have very generic metrics — pages viewed, generic bounce rate, very broad metrics. To really dive in, I like focusing and using the filters to go to specific areas on the site. So if it’s a destination like a hotel, “Oh, are they viewing the pages that helped them get there? Are they looking at the directional information? Are they viewing discounts and sorts of packages?” Think of the behavior on those types of pages you want to measure, and then reverse engineer. That way you can tell they executive, “Hey, this hotel reservation viewed these packages, which came from these sources, campaigns, search, and social.” Remember, you’re building it so that they can view it for themselves and really take advantage and see, “Oh, that’s working, and this campaign from this source had these behaviors that generated a reservation,” in that example.

#2 – CMO

Now, let’s look at it from a marketing perspective. You want to help make them look awesome. So I like to reverse it and start with the marketing side in terms of acquisition, then go to behavior on the website, and then end up with the same financials — money, conversion rate percentages, number of leads, number of hotel rooms booked, etc. I like to get really, really focused.

So when you’re building a dashboard for a CMO or anyone on the marketing side, talk to them about what metrics matter. What do they really want to learn? A lot of times you need to know their exact territory and really fine tune it in to figure out exactly what they want to find out.

Again, I’m a huge fan of filters. What behavior matters? So for example, one of our clients is Beardbrand. They sell beard oil and they support the Urban Beardsman. We know that their main markets are New York, Texas, California, and the Pacific Northwest. So we could have a very broad regional focus for acquisition, but we don’t. We know where their audience lives, we know what type of behavior they like, and ultimately what type of behavior on the website influences purchases.

So really think from a marketing perspective, “How do we want to measure the acquisition to the behavior on the website and ultimately what does that create?”

These are pretty common, so I think most people are using a marketing and executive dashboard. Here are some that have really made a huge difference for clients of ours.

#3 – New markets

Love new market dashboards. Let’s say, for example, you’re a hotel chain and you normally have people visiting your site from Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana. Well, what happened in our case, we had that excluded, and we were looking at states broader — Hawaii, Alaska, Colorado, Texas. Not normally people who would come to this particular hotel.

Well, we discovered in the dashboard — and it was actually the client that discovered it — that we suddenly had a 6000% increase in Hawaii. They called me and said, “Are we marketing to Hawaii?” I said no. They said, “Well, according to the dashboard, we’ve had 193 room nights in the past 2 months.” Like, “Wow, 193 room nights from Hawaii, what happened?” So we started reverse engineering that, and we found out that Allegiant Airlines suddenly had a direct flight from Honolulu to Spokane, and the hotel in this case was two miles from the hotel. They could then do paid search campaigns in Hawaii. They can try to connect with Allegiant to co-op some advertising and some messaging. Boom. Would never have been discovered without that dashboard.

#4 – Top content

Another example, top content. Again, going back to Beardbrand, they have a site called the Urban Beardsman, and they publish a lot of content for help and videos and tutorials. To measure that content, it’s really important, because they’re putting a lot of work into educating their market and new people who are growing beards and using their product. They want to know, “Is it worth it?” They’re hiring photographers, they’re hiring writers, and we’re able to see if people are reading the content they’re providing, and then ultimately, we’re focusing much more on their content on the behavior side and then figuring out what that outcome is.

A lot of people have content or viewing of the blog as part of an overall dashboard, let’s say for your CMO. I’m a big fan of, in addition to having that ,also having a very specific content dashboard so you can see your top blogs. Whatever content you provide, I want you to always know what that’s driving on your website.

#5 – Tech check

One of the things that I’ve never heard anyone talk about before, that we use all the time, is a tech check. So we want to see a setup so we can view mobile, tablet, desktop, browsers. What are your gaps? Where is your site possibly not being used to its fullest potential? Are there any issues with shopping carts? Where do they fall off on your website? Set up any possible tech that you can track. I’m a big fan of looking both on the mobile, tablet, any type of desktop, browsers especially to see where they’re falling off. For a lot of our clients, we’ll have two, three, or four different tech dashboards. Get them to the technical person on the client side so they can immediately see if there’s an issue. If they’ve updated the website, but maybe they forgot to update a certain portion of it, they’ve got a technical issue, and the dashboard can help detect that.

So these are just a few. I’m a huge fan of dashboards. They’re very powerful. But the big key is to make sure that not only you, but your client understands how to use them, and they use them on a regular basis.

I hope that’s been very helpful. Again, I’m Ed Reese, and these are my top five dashboards. Thanks.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com

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Maker Of Clearly Blue & Black Dress Now Marketing It As #TheDress

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – Not since “less filling” vs. “tastes great” has there been a debate this all-consuming. One little cocktail party dress is getting …

Search In Pics: Android Caveman, Google Ski Trip & Rope Logo

In this week’s Search In Pictures, here are the latest images culled from the web, showing what people eat at the search engine companies, how they play, who they meet, where they speak, what toys they have, and more. Google Android Caveman: Source: Google+ Google Rope Logo: Source: Google+…

Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

HTML Image Description Extension (longdesc) is a W3C Recommendation

The HTML5 Image Description Extension (longdesc) was published today as a Recommendation by the HTML Working Group, with the approval of the Protocols and Formats Working Group. This extension for HTML5 adds a longdesc attribute that is used to provide links to detailed descriptions of images, and is part of W3C’s work to ensure that the Open Web Platform is accessible to people with disabilities. Learn more about the HTML Activity and the WAI Technical Activity.

First Public Working Draft: Mobile Accessibility: How WCAG 2.0 and Other W3C/WAI Guidelines Apply

Mobile Accessibility: How WCAG 2.0 and Other W3C/WAI Guidelines Apply to Mobile was published today as a First Public Working Draft by the Mobile Accessibility Task Force, a joint Task Force of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines Working Group (WCAG WG) and the User Agent Accessibility Guidelines Working Group (UAAG WG). This document describes how WCAG 2.0 principles, guidelines, and success criteria apply to mobile web content, mobile web apps, native apps, and hybrid apps using web components inside native apps. It provides guidance on mobile accessibility issues — such as small screen size, touch target size, zoom, gestures — and how they relate to WCAG 2.0. It links to a list of existing WCAG Techniques that apply to mobile.

The document also highlights the relevance of UAAG 2.0 and ATAG 2.0 in the mobile context, and links to UAAG 2.0 mobile accessibility examples. This document provides informative guidance, and does not set requirements. It may become a W3C Working Group Note, or the information may be integrated into WCAG Techniques and Understanding WCAG. (It will not impact WCAG 2.0 itself; WCAG 2.0 is a stable standard that does not change.) For information on W3C WAI’s broader work related to mobile accessibility, see Mobile Accessibility. Learn more about the Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI).

Linked Data Platform 1.0 is a W3C Recommendation

The Linked Data Platform (LDP) Working Group has published a W3C Recommendation of Linked Data Platform 1.0. “Linked Data” refers to an approach to publishing data that puts linking at the heart of the notion of data, and uses the linking technologies provided by the Web to enable the weaving of a global distributed database. This specification defines a set of rules for HTTP operations on Web resources, some based on RDF, to provide an architecture for read-write Linked Data on the Web. Learn more about the Data Activity.

Two Security First Public Working Drafts Published

The Web Application Security Working Group has published a Working Draft of Content Security Policy Pinning. This document defines a new HTTP header that allows authors to instruct user agents to remember (“pin”) and enforce a Content Security Policy for a set of hosts for a period of time. Learn more about the Security Activity.

The group also published a Working Draft of Upgrade Insecure Requests. This document defines a mechanism which allows authors to instruct a user agent to upgrade a priori insecure resource requests to secure transport before Fetching them. Learn more about the Security Activity.

Updated Understanding Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 and Techniques for WCAG 2.0

The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) Working Group today published updates of two Notes that accompany WCAG 2.0: Understanding WCAG 2.0 and Techniques for WCAG 2.0. This is not an update to WCAG 2.0, which is a stable document. The WCAG guidelines and success criteria are designed to be broadly applicable to current and future web technologies, including dynamic applications, mobile, digital television, etc. The supporting resources published today provide specific guidance — including code examples, resources, and tests — and are updated periodically to cover current practices for meeting WCAG. For an introduction to the WCAG documents, see the WCAG Overview. Read about the Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI).